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UNEP's Information Unit for Conventions
UNEP's Information Unit for Conventions
Climate change has long-since ceased to be a scientific curiosity, and is no longerjust one of many environmental and regulatory concerns. As the United Nations Secretary General has said, it is the major, overriding environmental issue of our time, and the single greatest challenge facing environmental regulators. It is a growing crisis with economic, health and safety, food production, security, and other dimensions. Shifting weather patterns, for example, threaten food production through increased unpredictability of precipitation, rising sea levels contaminate coastal freshwater reserves and increase the risk of catastrophic flooding, and a warming atmosphere aids the pole-ward spread of pests and diseases once limited to the tropics. The news to date is bad and getting worse. Ice-loss from glaciers and ice sheets has continued, leading, for example, to the second straight year with an ice-free passage through Canada’s Arctic islands, and accelerating rates of ice-loss from ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica. Combined with thermal expansion—warm water occupies more volume than cold—the melting of ice sheets and glaciers around the world is contributing to rates and an ultimate extent of sea-level rise that could far outstrip those anticipated in the most recent global scientific assessment. There is alarming evidence that important tipping points, leading to irreversible changes in major ecosystems and the planetary climate system, may already have been reached or passed. Ecosystems as diverse as the Amazon rainforest and the Arctic tundra, for example, may be approaching thresholds of dramatic change through warming and drying. Mountain glaciers are in alarming retreat and the downstream effects of reduced water supply in the driest months will have repercussions that transcend generations. Climate feedback systems and environmental cumulative effects are building across Earth systems demonstrating behaviours we cannot anticipate. The potential for runaway greenhouse warming is real and has never been more present. The most dangerous climate changes may still be avoided if we transform our hydrocarbon based energy systems and if we initiate rational and adequately financed adaptation programmes to forestall disasters and migrations at unprecedented scales. The tools are available, but they must be applied immediately and aggressively.
World environmental organization
World environmental organization
The World Environmental Organization (World.Org) is devoted to the preservation of the natural diversity of plant and animal species, and their habitats, through the prevention of environmental degradation and destruction. World.Org develops and implements scientific strategies for decreasing fossil fuel use, preventing climate change, and preserving plant and animal species and their habitats.
United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
The United Nations Climate Change Conference took place in Cancun, Mexico, from 29 November to 10 December 2010. It encompassed the sixteenth Conference of the Parties (COP) and the sixth Conference of the Parties serving as the Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (CMP), as well as the thirty-third sessions of both the Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI) and the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA), and the fifteenth session of the AWG-KP and thirteenth session of the AWG-LCA.
Environmental Change and Security Project
Environmental Change and Security Project
Since 1994, the Environmental Change and Security Program (ECSP) has explored the connections among environmental, health, and population dynamics and their links to conflict, human insecurity, and foreign policy.
Environmental News Network
Environmental News Network
Why Do People Always Overestimate Slope? February 15, 2011 09:07 AM - David A Gabel, ENN "Holy Crap" is a very common phrase among mountain hikers when confronted by an intimidating slope. After plodding along at a nice five degree incline, a sudden rise in elevation can seem like either a daunting task or an irresistible challenge. I personally like sharp inclines because it means you can get more of the climb out of the way in quicker time. But sometimes that intimidating slope is not quite what it seems. According to a new study in the journal, Psychological Science, people routinely overestimate slope, whether they stand from the top or bottom. Our brains are hardwired to believe the incline is worse than it actually is.
Art of Conservation
Art of Conservation
Art of Conservation (AoC) provides innovative and comprehensive year-long conservation and health education programs for children attending primary school in rural communities bordering Rwanda’s Volcanoes National Park. AoC’s overall approach is to teach lessons about the importance of maintaining a healthy environment for both people and animals, while instilling in them an understanding of and respect for themselves, their peers, and the natural world. For instance, to help combat deforestation in the mountain gorilla habitat, AoC supports initiatives in local communities using fuel briquettes as an alternative to charcoal. AoC applies a unique methodology by utilizing visual, auditory, and performance arts to teach lessons and inspire creativity in its students. AoC addresses health conflicts that arise as a result of human and mountain gorilla populations living side by side around Volcanoes National Park. AoC recognizes the interconnectedness and necessity of good health in both populations. In partnership with other local and international organizations, which focus on the health care of the gorillas and people, AoC seeks to create a new paradigm through its approach.

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